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Purdue Master's

Curriculum

The Krannert Weekend MBA program provides a learning experience far superior to online-only options. Here, you interact in person with esteemed professors who bring extensive teaching, research, and industry experience to their instruction. Through case studies, research projects, group presentations, and lectures, Purdue’s Weekend MBA courses enhance your critical abilities and skills in decision and policy-making aspects of finance, marketing, leadership, and more. Plus, you’ll collaborate with like-minded professionals from diverse industries to learn from their methods.

The courses in the program have an applied policy-making orientation, including extensive use of cases and other experiential materials. The curriculum comprises a set of common core courses that all participants take. This design is consistent with the standards of AACSB International– The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business–and is accredited by that global association of management master’s degree programs.

The Weekend MBA is a cohort program, in which all participants enter, take the common set of courses, and graduate together–making it possible for the Friday and Saturday class sessions to be engaged and a vibrate student community. At the initial orientation sessions, participants are introduced to the program, meet the instructors, and receive initial assignments for the semester.

Participants download weekly reading and written assignments, all of which are specified in course syllabi accessible from our on-line course management database, Katalyst, in the week prior to each Friday/Saturday session. Each course includes a combination of lectures, discussions, case analyses, computer simulations, study group presentations, and research projects. Written examinations, class participation, and other assignments contribute to determining grades for each course.

The program is intensive, demanding, and rigorous – but richly rewarding. We expect serious preparation and total commitment from all participants. Program alumni report that, because the work is intellectually challenging, the improvement in their managerial skill set was both immediate and substantial.

Module 1 (Fall)

Financial Accounting-MGMT 600
This course is an introduction to Financial Management. As such, the course addresses the two basic financial problems that all companies face: (1) On what should funds be spent (i.e., investment decisions)? and (2) From where should funds be obtained (i.e., financing decisions)? Specific topics include financial statement analysis, financial planning, stock and bond valuation, project analysis (i.e., capital budgeting), estimating the cost of capital, understanding capital structure, and estimating firm value. Readings, case analyses, and problem sets focus on the basic tools used by financial analysts and financial decision makers.

Managing Behavior in Organizations-OBHR 681
Individual and group behavior are the central components of the study of behavior in organizations. Focus is on the managerial application of knowledge to issues such as motivation, group processes, leadership, organizational design structure, and others. The course employs cases, exercises, discussions, and lectures.

Microeconomics-MGMT 514
This course covers microeconomic concepts relevant to managerial decision making. Topics may include: demand and supply analysis; consumer demand theory; production theory; price discrimination; perfect competition; partial equilibrium welfare analysis; externalities and public goods; risk aversion and risk sharing; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; rudimentary game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility; and transaction cost economics.

Financial Management-MGMT 610
This course is an introduction to Financial Management. As such, the course addresses the two basic financial problems that all companies face: (1) On what should funds be spent (i.e., investment decisions)? and (2) From where should funds be obtained (i.e., financing decisions)? Specific topics include financial statement analysis, financial planning, stock and bond valuation, project analysis (i.e., capital budgeting), estimating the cost of capital, understanding capital structure, and estimating firm value. Readings, case analyses, and problem sets focus on the basic tools used by financial analysts and financial decision makers.

Human Resource Management-OBHR 633

Module 2 (Spring)

Quantitative Methods-MGMT 670
Managers encounter data daily and regularly base their decisions on it. This course in business analytics develops important skills in data analysis, modeling, and decision making under uncertainty. It is designed to train students to use valid inferences data to inform their decisions. The topics covered in the course include exploratory data analysis, probability, decision analysis, estimation, simulation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis. Business Analytics emphasizes applications of analytical techniques through its lectures, homework assignments, case analysis and discussions, and computer exercises. Effort is made to translate the statistical results into language understood by non-technical audience and similar communication is expected from students.

Marketing Management-MGMT 620
An integrated analysis of major marketing decisions, including product pricing, advertising, distribution, and sales force policies.

Strategic Management-MGMT 650
Strategic Management is concerned with understanding how organizations might achieve advantage relative to competitors. In particular, it deals with the organization, management, and strategic positioning of the firm so as to gain long-term competitive advantage. To address this issue, we take on the role of general managers, or integrators – that is, managers who make decisions that cut across the functional and product boundaries of a firm. By focusing on what makes managers effective, we shall develop the ability to evaluate different situations and give you usable skills regardless of the business context in which you want to work. Strategic management issues that we will consider include the following: How can my firm create value (e.g., low cost or differentiation; using resources; integrating activities correctly) relative to the competition? How do other players in the industry impact the amount of value I capture from my activities? How can the firm identify new opportunities for value creation and value capture and implement those activities within the firm? How can a corporation create (rather than destroy) economic value through its multimarket activities? What options are available to a firm to successfully diversify?

Introduction to Operations Management-MGMT 660
As goods and services are produced and distributed, they move through a set of inter-related operations or processes in order to match supply with demand. The design of these operations for strategic advantage, investment in improving their efficiency and effectiveness, and controlling these operations to meet performance objectives is the domain of Operations Management. The primary objective of this course is to provide an overview of this important functional area of business.

Module 3 (Summer)

Macroeconomics-ECON 515
Investigation of the causes of macroeconomic fluctuations in the economy. Looks at changes in inflation, unemployment, real output, interest rates, and exchange rates, and explores why they occur, what their effects are, and what, if any, role government should play in dealing with these problems. A mixture of theory and case studies with reference to historical case studies. Current macroeconomic problems will be discussed with a focus on the international aspects of macroeconomic problems.

Supply Chain Management-MGMT 664
A supply chain includes supply, production, storage, distribution, and selling facilities that are connected by material, informational, and financial links. The goal of Supply Chain Management (SCM) is to maximize the economic value that can be generated by managing the strategic design of such supply network and choice of its capacity; the tactical planning of this capacity and related management of production, inventory, and logistics activities; and the operational control of the flows of materials, information, and money and the stocks of physical goods in this network. This course explores how firms can make better SCM choices using various analytical tools and high-level insights needed by supply chain managers and consultants. Topics Covered:
      • Supply Chain Performance
      • Network Design and Flexibility
      • Transportation
      • Sourcing Decisions
      • Demand Forecasting
      • Supply and Operations Planning
      • Coordination and Contracting in Supply Chain
      • Risk Management in Supply Chain[/reveal]

Module 4 (Fall)

Principles of Information Systems-MGMT 590

Global Marketing Management-MGMT 649

A seminar using lecture-discussions, cases, and projects. Designed to cover the global marketing environment, market-entry strategy, global marketing programs, organization and control of global marketing operations, and the future of global marketing.

Project Management-MGMT 562
This course exposes students to unique techniques and strategies for accomplishing specialized missions or work where normal organizational structure or methods are not sufficient. Introduction to Microsoft Project, case studies, text readings, project examples, modeling techniques, and traditional project management tools, prepare students for the in-depth, end of module group project. The Precedence Board Game is used in this class.

Business Law-MGMT 630

Elective

Elective

Module 5 (Spring)

Elective

Elective

Elective

Elective