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Brian Dineen

Brian Dineen

The Frederick and Alice Leeds Professor of Management
Associate Department Head in Management
Organizational Behavior/Human Resources

Education

Ph.D., Labor and Human Resources, The Ohio State University
MLHR, Labor and Human Resources, The Ohio State University
B.B.A., University of Notre Dame

CV

Brian Dineen is the Leeds Professor of Management. His research interests span issues related to recruitment, job search, and employee retention.  More specifically, he investigates factors that influence the quality of initial applicant pools in organizations, including recruitment message orientation and mass customization, as well as effort expenditure and resume fraud among job seekers.  He also studies employee retention issues that include Human Resource Management inducements and investments and third party employment branding. His research has been published in outlets such as the Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Human Resource Management Journal, Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management, Organizational Psychology Review, and the Journal of Management. His most recent work is a result of two research grants from the National Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Foundation. He has taught Human Resource Management, Organizational Behavior, and Negotiations courses to undergraduate, graduate, and Ph.D. students. He is currently on the editorial boards of the Journal of Applied Psychology, Personnel Psychology, Journal of Management, and Human Resource Management Review.

  • Resume Fraud

    Truth or Consequences: Measuring intentional resume deception among job seekers

    Resume fraud is increasingly common in today’s competitive job market, typically garnering the most media attention when it involves top-level executives. According to Brian Dineen, a professor of organizational behavior/human resources in Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, it’s even more prevalent among rank and file employees, with some staffing agencies reporting erroneous information in more than half of their screened resumes.

    Full story: Truth or Consequences: Measuring intentional resume deception among job seekers

  •  Business

    Working Best

    Countless business publications across the globe rank the “Best Places to Work” on an annual basis, but how does this relate to key human capital outcomes? A recent study coauthored by Purdue's Brian Dineen, an associate professor of organizational behavior and human resources at the Krannert School, finds that companies who receive such awards have an easier task of retaining staff.

    Full story: Working Best

  • best places to work

    Professor Brian Dineen discusses his research about the hiring effects on companies of “best places to work” certifications with Krannert Dean David Hummels.

  • Resume fraud linked to job search envy

    Unemployed job-seekers can be motivated to embellish their resumes when they are envious of peers, according to a study published in the Academy of Management Journal.

  • best places to work

    Brian Dineen Associate Professor of Management on best places to work

  • Convocation recognizes faculty for honors, awards, teaching excellence

    Faculty members were recognized Tuesday (May 7) at the Faculty Awards Convocation for a range of honors, including national and international awards; University and college awards; Fellow awards; and distinguished and named professorships. Among the honorees from the Krannert School of Management were faculty members Brian Dineen, Heather Howard, David Schoorman and Ilana Stonebraker.

    Full story: Convocation recognizes faculty for honors, awards, teaching excellence

  • Brian Dineen
    Study: Resume fraud linked to job search envy

    Unemployed job-seekers can be motivated to embellish their resumes when they are envious of peers, according to a study published in the Academy of Management Journal.

Contact

dineenb@purdue.edu
Phone: (765) 496-2022
Office: RAWL 4037

Area(s) of Expertise

Recruitment, Employment Branding, Counterproductive Employee Behavior, Resume Fraud