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Faculty Research

  • Image of rising home prices

    What Does Airbnb Do to the Local Housing Market? Make It Less Affordable

    Wednesday, August 18, 2021

    Home-sharing platforms, particularly Airbnb, have enjoyed tremendous growth over the last decade, as property owners have capitalized on the opportunity to offer rooms, apartments and entire homes to travelers seeking short-term rentals. The proliferation of Airbnb properties has sparked criticism that Airbnb hosts are snatching up homes that would otherwise be listed in the residential rental or housing market, thus reducing supply and driving up prices.

    Full article: What Does Airbnb Do to the Local Housing Market? Make It Less Affordable

  • Married couple arguing

    Misery Loves Company: How Your Partner's Roles Influence Your Work-Family Satisfaction

    Thursday, August 12, 2021

    Donna and Rhonda work at the same office and have comparable job responsibilities. Yet things are quite different at their respective homes, where they live with working partners. Donna has few responsibilities compared to her partner, Kim, who handles almost all the domestic chores and takes time off from work whenever their child is sick. Rhonda, on the other hand, often feels overwhelmed with housework and the burdens of raising four children, and so does her husband, Mark, who shares the household duties and also takes care of an aging parent.

    Full article: Misery Loves Company: How Your Partner's Roles Influence Your Work-Family Satisfaction

  • Couple shopping at Indian store

    Understanding the Stockist's Contract: How Millions of Small Stores in India Get Their Goods

    Thursday, August 12, 2021

    If you're out of laundry detergent in America, you're likely to get into your car and drive to a big-box or mid-sized store that's part of a national or regional chain. If you're in India, you'll probably take a stroll to a tiny store in your neighborhood, where hundreds of consumer goods are within reach of a storekeeper eager to serve you. About 12 million small stores operate in India, occupying street corners and other spaces in residential areas and generating more than 90 percent of retail sales.

    Full article: Understanding the Stockist's Contract: How Millions of Small Stores in India Get Their Goods

  • lending computer key

    Research shows disparity in borrower benefits between local banks and online lenders

    Tuesday, July 27, 2021

    The proliferation of online marketplace lending has been disrupting the consumer credit market, giving borrowers increased options for consolidating debt and building credit. Although marketplace lenders like the Lending Club, Prosper and others can transcend the geographic boundaries of traditional banks, the ultimate benefits to marketplace borrowers can still differ because local opportunities to replace marketplace loans vary.

    Full article: Research shows disparity in borrower benefits between local banks and online lenders

  • Initial Public Offering digital sign

    Research examines firms’ preferences for technological acquisition

    Wednesday, July 14, 2021

    Why do some firms routinely acquire more technology than others? That’s the central question addressed in a recent study by Luis Rios, an assistant professor in the strategic management area at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management. The paper, “On the origin of technological acquisition strategy: The interaction between organizational plasticity and environmental munificence,” was recently published in Strategic Management Journal.

    Full article: Research examines firms’ preferences for technological acquisition

  • Man holding entrepreneur sign

    Stay or Go? Research explores the transition from paid employment to entrepreneurship

    Wednesday, June 16, 2021

    Leaving a safe and secure job to pursue a business venture as an entrepreneur can be a daunting endeavor. What motivates these people to take the leap of faith? A new study coauthored by Jordan Nielsen, an assistant professor at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, examines events that may motivate people to leave their employment and pursue entrepreneurship.

    Full article: Stay or Go? Research explores the transition from paid employment to entrepreneurship

  • leadership imagery

    Happy Family, Happy Work: Study links transformational leadership to attachment theory

    Tuesday, May 18, 2021

    “Transformational leadership — or behaviors that inspire followers to move beyond their own self-interest and work toward the good of the group — often fails to reach the levels needed by subordinates each day,” says Benjamin Dunford, an associate professor of organizational behavior/human resources at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management. “Supervisors need regular support to ensure that they consistently display these expected behaviors at work.”

    Full article: Happy Family, Happy Work: Study links transformational leadership to attachment theory

  • Gender equity

    Study identifies seven steps for advancing career equality amid pandemic

    Tuesday, May 18, 2021

    Gender equality has become a hot topic in management as business leaders address growing pressures to advance women who remain significantly underrepresented in key leadership jobs and face an on-going pay and stock equity gap, says Ellen Ernst Kossek, the Basil S. Turner Professor of Management at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: Study identifies seven steps for advancing career equality amid pandemic

  • pesticide spraying

    Using Social Media to Drive Adoption of Sustainable Products in Emerging Markets

    Friday, April 30, 2021

    Researchers from City, University of London, University of Chicago, and Purdue University published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that demonstrates that social media can be used to alleviate a major deterrent that hinders the adoption of a new technology: customer uncertainty.

    Full article: Using Social Media to Drive Adoption of Sustainable Products in Emerging Markets

  • social security application

    Retirement Risks: Research finds that claiming benefits early increases mortality for men

    Friday, October 30, 2020

    If your year-end goals include planning for retirement, you might want to rethink your options for when to start claiming benefits. In “The Mortality Effects of Retirement: Evidence from Social Security Eligibility at Age 62,” published in the Journal of Public Economics, Krannert researcher Tim Moore and colleague Maria Fitzpatrick of Cornell University show that declining labor force participation leads to an immediate jump in mortality.

    Full article: Retirement Risks: Research finds that claiming benefits early increases mortality for men

  • Emergency room sing

    New research finds utilizing telemedicine in the ER can reduce wait times and patient length of stay

    Friday, October 30, 2020

    Telemedicine has become more common given the current global pandemic. COVID-19 has limited doctor’s office and hospital visits to ensure safety for everyone. But rather than diminish the quality of care, new research coauthored by Purdue's Susan Lu in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research finds that increasing wider use of telemedicine in the emergency room (ER) can yield positive results for patients and providers alike.

    Full article: New research finds utilizing telemedicine in the ER can reduce wait times and patient length of stay

  • handshake

    Krannert research examines potential pitfalls of rehiring ‘boomerang’ employees

    Monday, July 27, 2020

    Although numerous studies have examined the performance outcomes for both internal and external hires, few have considered “boomerang employees” who are rehired by a company where they previously worked. Michael A. Campion, Purdue’s Herman C. Krannert of Professor of Management, addresses that research gap in his paper “Welcome Back? Job Performance and Turnover of Boomerang Employees Compared to Internal and External Hires,” forthcoming in Journal of Management.

    Full article: Krannert research examines potential pitfalls of rehiring ‘boomerang’ employees

  • Live Theatre Can Supplement Business Ethics Education, Study Says

    Wednesday, April 15, 2020

    Research completed by Purdue Convocations in partnership with Krannert School of Management suggests live theatre could be used as a teaching tool in business ethics education. Students were asked to analyze the 1984 Bhopal gas tragedy scenario both before and after attending a live theatre performance featuring related narrative themes. The study centered on a performance of “Frankenstein,” based on the critically-acclaimed book by Mary Shelley.

    Full article: Live Theatre Can Supplement Business Ethics Education, Study Says

  • robot using gavel

    How can we make sure that algorithms are fair?

    Monday, December 16, 2019

    Machine and human intelligences bring different strengths to the table. Researchers like me are working to understand how algorithms can complement human skills while at the same time minimizing the liabilities of relying on machine intelligence.

    Full article: How can we make sure that algorithms are fair?

  •  President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa speaks during a press conference on June 1, 2007 in Pretoria, South Africa. (Credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)

    Leaders with Economics Know-How Drive Faster GDP Growth

    Sunday, December 1, 2019

    National economies may perform better after politicians who have studied economics take power, according to new research.

    Full article: Leaders with Economics Know-How Drive Faster GDP Growth

  • Collateralized Debt Obligations

    Incentives for Reckless Investing? How CDO managers contributed to the 2007-09 financial crisis

    Friday, September 6, 2019

    Collateralized debt obligations (CDOs) and other structured products played a significant role in the credit boom of the early 2000s and the ensuing financial crisis of 2007 to 2009. Contributing to the economic disaster were the actions of a number of CDO collateral managers, who packed their products with inferior components: risky portions of private-label residential mortgage-backed securities. Research by Sergey Chernenko, associate professor in Purdue’s Krannert School of Management, shows why these collateral managers were willing to risk their reputations and select low-quality investments.

    Full article: Incentives for Reckless Investing? How CDO managers contributed to the 2007-09 financial crisis

  • Awards Announced in MSI Research Grant Competition

    Monday, August 26, 2019

    The Marketing Science Institute (MSI) recently announced 15 winners in the 2018-2020 Research Priorities Research Grant Competition. Launched in 2018 to seed research pertaining to MSI’s research priorities, the competition drew 74 submissions from leading researchers on topics including consumer trust, digital ads, privacy, AI, and machine learning. Among the winners was a proposal titled "Regulating Professional Players on Peer-to-Peer Platforms: Evidence from Airbnb" that was co-authored by Prof. Zaiyan Wei from the Purdue University Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: Awards Announced in MSI Research Grant Competition

  • Small Innovators

    Tuesday, August 20, 2019

    Deniz Yavuz discusses resent research on Small Innovators

  • The impact of monetary rewards on online reviews

    Friday, August 16, 2019

    Several online retailers provide monetary rewards to users for sharing their opinions on their review platforms. In a study published in Information Systems Research in 2018, Krannert PhD, Professor Warut Khern-am-nuai and Krannert Professors, Kannan and Ghasemkhani, take advantage of the sudden introduction of monetary incentives by a prominent American retailer to study how such rewards affect user behavior. Utilizing a natural experiment design, they find that in the presence of monetary incentives, users write more positive and lower quality reviews. They also find that previously active members contributed fewer reviews after the rewards were introduced.

  • Accounting Information, Stakeholders, and Firm Choices

    Friday, August 9, 2019

    Thomas Godwin briefly discusses the relationship between stakeholders, accounting information, and firm behavior.

  • Bank Audit Committee Financial Experts

    Friday, August 9, 2019

    In this video, Krannert Professor Diana Choi illustrates research on the effects of bank audit committee expertise on banks' loan loss provision timeliness.

  • Researchers including Krannert's Tim Bond have found that it is nearly impossible to draw definitive conclusions from happiness surveys

    Face Facts: The sad truth about measuring happiness

    Wednesday, July 31, 2019

    We are fascinated by happiness, that elusive life goal. Why are some people — and entire countries — happier than others? The results of happiness surveys are more than a favorite internet trending topic, however. According to a recent study co-authored by Tim Bond, an associate professor of economics at the Krannert School of Management and a faculty affiliate of the Purdue University Research Center in Economics, happiness scales could also have profound impact on public policy.

    Full article: Face Facts: The sad truth about measuring happiness

  • Burnout was more likely to occur among organizational newcomers and internal job changers and less likely to occur among organizational insiders.

    Up in Smoke: Employee burnout more prevalent among newcomers, internal job changers

    Tuesday, July 30, 2019

    Burnout — the word evokes a feeling of deflation. A smoking matchstick, a dwindling campfire, tires skidded to a stop. For many in the workplace, it’s a familiar feeling. Although the concept dates back to the 1970s, most studies addressed it from a static perspective. Research from Professor Benjamin Dunford at Purdue University's Krannert School of Management, however, takes a more dynamic approach by examining burnout throughout difference phases of employees' careers.

    Full article: Up in Smoke: Employee burnout more prevalent among newcomers, internal job changers

  • Social Media Influencers

    Group Think: Trump social media summit shows power of social networks

    Wednesday, July 24, 2019

    President Donald Trump’s recent social media summit at the White House featured a who’s-who of conservative influencers. The meeting came as many Americans begin to sound alarms about the subversive potential of social media to censor or sway voters during the 2020 general election. Brad Alge, an associate professor in the Purdue University Krannert School of Management, examines how organizations can leverage this power to influence and institute change among groups of people.

    Full article: Group Think: Trump social media summit shows power of social networks

  • A Purdue University team has developed X-Blockchain, a crypto-powered ledger technology that allows users to perform transactions in a confidential manner.

    Data Confidence: Blockchain technology helps users share rewards

    Wednesday, July 24, 2019

    Facebook’s announcement to get into the banking business is putting a new spotlight on blockchain technology. Facebook plans to launch a blockchain-based financial network using Libra, which is being touted as the tech giant’s digital currency. Purdue University researchers led by Krannert Professor Mohammad Rahman have developed X-Blockchain, a crypto-powered ledger technology that allows users to perform transactions in a confidential manner.

    Full article: Data Confidence: Blockchain technology helps users share rewards

  • How are people influenced by their informal ties

    Saturday, July 20, 2019

    Research by Brad Alge and collegues

  • The Edge of Risk: Now Is the Time to Move the Needle on US Work-Family Policies

    Monday, June 24, 2019

    Ellen Ernst Kossek, the Basil S. Turner Professor of Management at the Purdue University Krannert School of Management and research director of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Center for Leadership Excellence, discusses the urgent need for U.S. work-family policy reform in a column for Brink, a publication focused on comprehensive insights on risk in the areas of environment, economy, society, geopolitics and technology.

    Full article: The Edge of Risk: Now Is the Time to Move the Needle on US Work-Family Policies

  • Homesharing

    Left Behind: How disruptive technology may choose society's winners and losers

    Tuesday, June 18, 2019

    New platforms like home- and ride-sharing services often are praised for leveling the playing field, cutting out the middle man and boosting the economy. However, what if the explosion of disruptive technology is exploiting our biases, rather than helping us overcome them? This phenomenon is highlighted by new findings from an Airbnb study by Prof. Mohammand Rahman and doctoral student Mohammed Alyakoob from Purdue University's Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: Left Behind: How disruptive technology may choose society's winners and losers

  • Women's career equality and leadership in organizations: Creating an evidence-based positive change

    Friday, June 7, 2019

    Research on women's career equality and leadership is growing in importance for advancing social justice, equal employment opportunity, and global and national economic goals. Despite the increased attention being paid to gender equality for decades, progression has slowed or stalled around the globe, in many countries, such as United States. The goal of this special issue is to address the persistent research-to-practice gap in developing and implementing practical solutions for a positive change to advance women's career equality. In this introduction, we provide a brief overview of the approaches used to study women's careers and discuss how research and practices that are more inclusive of women's needs, values, and career experiences should be broadened to include more expansive and less-gendered notions of careers. Then, we introduce the articles in the special issue that inform current directions in (a) career and leadership theory, research, and methodologies for gender equality and (b) the application of scholarship to organizations. We conclude with a summary of some lessons for future research and practice on closing the women's career-equality gap.

    Full article: Women's career equality and leadership in organizations: Creating an evidence-based positive change

  • Nursing Home Patient

    Work Patch: Improved scheduling could improve life in nursing homes

    Thursday, May 23, 2019

    Placing a loved one in a nursing home can be a traumatic experience for the entire family with concerns about the care and attention they will receive. According to Ellen Ernst Kossek, the Basil S. Turner Professor at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, those concerns could be eased by some simple changes in the way the schedules are done for the staff at that facility.

    Full article: Work Patch: Improved scheduling could improve life in nursing homes

  • Contract design for the Stockist in Indian Distribution Networks

    Thursday, May 16, 2019

    https://pubsonline.informs.org/doi/abs/10.1287/msom.2018.0722

  • Residency Matching

    Match Day: A new approach to couples in MD residencies

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019

    Every year in March, seniors at U.S. medical schools eagerly await Match Day, when these soon-to-be doctors learn which hospitals they've been matched with for their residency training. For more than 65 years, the matches have largely been made through the National Resident Match Program, which owes its longevity and high rate of participation to its effectiveness. But it gets more complicated when couples are involved, according to a study co-authored by Thanh Nguyen, an assistant professor in Purdue's Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: Match Day: A new approach to couples in MD residencies

  • Robot Nurse

    Does Technology Replace Nurses? Not necessarily...

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019

    Nurses have many duties, but none is more important than providing bedside care to patients. A research study co-authored by Susan F. Lu, associate professor of management in Purdue's Krannert School of Management, shows some nurses may lose their jobs when automation arrives at their workplaces. But the reverse may happen at other healthcare facilities: new technology may spark the hiring of more nurses.

    Full article: Does Technology Replace Nurses? Not necessarily...

  • Ben Dunford

    Balancing Act: Happy hospital employees lead to more satisfied patients

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019

    Helping employees balance their work and family needs is increasingly important for not only attracting and retaining key talent in healthcare, but also for enhancing patient care. According to research by Ben Dunford, an associate professor of management at Krannert and a faculty affiliate of the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering in Purdue’s Discovery Park, more satisfied employees can mean more satisfied patients.

    Full article: Balancing Act: Happy hospital employees lead to more satisfied patients

  • Employees package items for shipment at a Haworth plant in Holland, Mich. The company is experimenting with three-day work weeks. PHOTO: EMILY ROSE BENNETT FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

    Factories Tire of Wage Wars; Give Fridays Off, Spiff Up Bathrooms

    Friday, May 10, 2019

    Ellen Kossek, the Basil S. Turner Professor of Management & Research Director of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Center for Leadership at Purdue University, comments on work-life balance in the Wall Street Journal.

    Full article: Factories Tire of Wage Wars; Give Fridays Off, Spiff Up Bathrooms

  • Electoral College

    Expanding the Battleground: A competitive approach to presidential election reform

    Monday, April 1, 2019

    With numerous candidates already in line for the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries, the discussion among most political pundits centers on which challenger has the best potential to secure the 270 electoral votes needed in the general election to unseat the incumbent and presumptive Republican nominee, President Donald Trump. Shai Vardi, an assistant professor of management information systems at the Purdue University Krannert School of Management, presents a competitive alternative to the current system in a working paper titled “Expanding the Battleground: A Bipartisan Approach to Presidential Election Reform.”

    Full article: Expanding the Battleground: A competitive approach to presidential election reform

  • Resume Fraud

    Truth or Consequences: Measuring intentional resume deception among job seekers

    Monday, April 1, 2019

    Resume fraud is increasingly common in today’s competitive job market, typically garnering the most media attention when it involves top-level executives. According to Brian Dineen, a professor of organizational behavior/human resources in Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, it’s even more prevalent among rank and file employees, with some staffing agencies reporting erroneous information in more than half of their screened resumes.

    Full article: Truth or Consequences: Measuring intentional resume deception among job seekers

  • C-suite GCs

    Risky Business: Promoting general counsel to the C-suite

    Monday, April 1, 2019

    Rewarding a high-performing manager or mid-level executive with a promotion to the C-suite is a common practice in many corporations, ideally producing a positive impact on the bottom line and perceived financial stability among stakeholders. But what about promoting those who have been trained in law rather than business? According to research published in the Journal of Accounting and Economics co-authored by Kevin Koharki, an associate professor of accounting in Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management, the changing role of corporations’ general counsel (GC) and their increasing ascendance into senior management positions can produce less desirable outcomes.

    Full article: Risky Business: Promoting general counsel to the C-suite

  • Financial Reporting

    Fouling Up: Can higher penalties encourage good companies to manipulate their financial reports?

    Monday, April 1, 2019

    In September 2018, Orlando-based SeaWorld Entertainment and its former CEO agreed to pay a penalty of more than $5 million to the Securities and Exchange Commission for misleading investors about the impact of the documentary film Blackfish on the company’s reputation and business. A study by accounting professors at Purdue’s Krannert School of Management and TCU’s Neeley School of Business finds that while penalties on companies for misconduct in financial reporting help to improve investment efficiency, increasing such penalties may induce entrepreneurs with good projects to offer rosier pictures of their prospects.

    Full article: Fouling Up: Can higher penalties encourage good companies to manipulate their financial reports?

  • Automobile Data

    Driving Data: The cost and benefits of usage-based auto insurance

    Monday, April 1, 2019

    Having a technological device collect data on your every turn, stop and driving maneuver may be annoying, but new research from Purdue’s Krannert School of Management and the University of British Columbia (UBC) shows that people’s driving techniques may actually improve when they know their insurance company is watching. Titled “Sensor Data and Behavioral Tracking: Does Usage-Based Auto Insurance Benefit Drivers?” and recently published in Marketing Science, the paper was co-authored by Ting Zhu, an associate professor of marketing at the Purdue University Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: Driving Data: The cost and benefits of usage-based auto insurance

  • Reducing Hospital Readmissions

    Friday, January 18, 2019

    Professor Pengyi Shi on using data analytics to reduce hospital readmissions and congestion

  • Business groups and employment

    Thursday, December 6, 2018

    Professor Mara Faccio discusses her research on business groups and employment

  • Liquidity in the corporate bond market

    Saturday, December 1, 2018

    Cash In or Cash Out? Krannert's Sergey Chernenko discusses liquidity in the corporate bond market

  • Price Knowledge and Market Power

    Wednesday, November 14, 2018

    Krannert's Federico Rossi discusses consumers’ price knowledge and retailers’ market power

  • Downside of High Information Quality

    Thursday, November 8, 2018

    Professor Lin Nan discusses her research on the downside of high information quality in accounting

  • Good Medicine

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    Looking for a high-caliber surgeon may be easier than previously thought. Critics of online rating platforms have stated that online physicians’ ratings are nothing more than a popularity contest, but a new study by Susan Lu, a professor at the Purdue University Krannert School of Management, suggests that the time-honored word-of-mouth method for finding quality health care may hold up after all.

  • Designer Elections

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    When Donald Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, many voters and political pundits were surprised by the outcome. But the campaign strategies used by the opposing candidates were entirely predictable, says Karthik Kannan, a professor at the Purdue University Krannert School of Management and an expert in big data who studies systems that exploit instincts and biases to nudge human behavior.

    Full article: Designer Elections

  •  150 Years of Giant Leaps

    What Next?

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    Purdue University’s sesquicentennial celebration marks a time for the university to renew its commitment to growth, discovery and innovation. What giant leaps will the next 150 years bring as Purdue continues its drive to meet the world's future challenges? David Hummels, dean of the Krannert School of Management, shares his thoughts on the future of the school over the next 150 years.

    Full article: What Next?

  •  person on phone

    'Technostress' Management

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    Do you check your work email from home during off hours and weekends? Do you eat lunch at your desk or use break time to answer work or personal emails or texts? Chances are, many of us are “overworking” more than is necessary to be effective in our jobs, says work-life balance expert Ellen Ernst Kossek, a professor at Purdue University's Krannert School of Management.

    Full article: 'Technostress' Management

  •  Big Data

    Digital Revolution

    Monday, November 5, 2018

    Mohammad Rahman graduated with a degree in computer science during the emergence of a digital renaissance, going on to become an MBA student who foresaw both technology’s transformative role in commerce and its destructive potential. Rahman, now a professor in the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University, studies how digital platforms have grown to revolutionize the world of retail and fundamentally change how businesses interact with consumers.

    Full article: Digital Revolution

  • Discretion used in finacial reporting

    Thursday, October 4, 2018

    Accounting professor Jonathan Black discusses his research on discretion in financial reporting

  • Car share systems

    Thursday, September 20, 2018

    Krannert professor Mengshi Lu discusses his research on car share systems

  • Airbnb affects on parallel industries

    Wednesday, July 11, 2018

    Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could spill over into complementary industries, such as the restaurant business, unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests.

  • Role of performing arts in business ethics education

    Friday, June 22, 2018

    Amy David discusses the role of performing arts in business ethics education

  •  Breaking Bias

    Bridging the Gaps

    Friday, June 15, 2018

    In the wake of the #MeToo social media movement, which has grown to include gender inequity in the workplace, a March 2018 conference at Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management served as a call to action among U.S. companies. Featuring prominent scholars and corporate leaders dedicated to diversity and inclusion in the workplace, the conference highlighted the disparity in the number of men and women filling leadership roles and other biases ingrained into business cultures and practices.

    Full article: Bridging the Gaps

  •  Idea Light Bulb

    Nobel Ideas

    Friday, June 15, 2018

    Purdue’s Krannert School of Management presented a public panel discussion sponsored by the Hugh and Judy Pence family that focused on interdisciplinary perspectives on early childhood development and a fireside chat with Nobel Laureate James Heckman as part of an Economic Ideas Forum in April that served as the inaugural event of the University’s growing economic research center.

    Full article: Nobel Ideas

  •  reports in board room

    Advancing Accounting

    Friday, June 15, 2018

    The Krannert School of Management presented the fourth annual Purdue Accounting Theory Conference in May with a program that included distinguished guest speakers from across the country as well as rising scholars in the field. Accounting professors Mark Bagnoli, the Olson Chair in Management, and Susan Watts, the Emanuel T. Weiler Chair in Management, served as coordinators of the conference along with Associate Professor Lin Nan.

    Full article: Advancing Accounting

  • Facial emotion detection

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018

    Kemal Altinkemer discusses his research on facial emotion detection

  • Mobile coupons delivery problem

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018

    Kemal Altinkemer discusses mobile coupons delivery problem

  • Resident matching between hospitals and doctors

    Wednesday, June 13, 2018

    Thanh Nguyen discusses resident matching between hospitals and doctors

  • Work-Family Backlash

    Monday, June 4, 2018

    PhD grad Matthew Perrigino and faculty members Kelly Schwind Wilson and Benjamin Dunford discuss their research on work-family backlash

  • Aluminum-cerium alloy recycling

    Friday, April 27, 2018

    Ananth Iyer discusses Aluminum-Cerium Alloy Recycling

  • Phone polices influence working experience

    Tuesday, April 17, 2018

    Ellen Ernst Kossek discusses about how phone polices influence employees' working experience

  • Conflict management

    Tuesday, April 17, 2018

    Benjamin Dunford discusses conflict management

  • Laptop & Smartphone

    Consumer Consumption

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018

    A pair of faculty members from Purdue University’s Krannert School of Management recently won a research grant of $50,000 from Adobe Systems as part of an industry and academic collaboration that aims to find new ways to solve the challenges that plague today’s online marketers.

    Full article: Consumer Consumption

  •  Nuclear Power Plant

    Clean Trade

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018

    Countries across the globe now use emissions-trading systems as a policy to cost-effectively reduce pollution. But what incentives do these tradable-permit markets offer companies to invest in advanced pollution-abatement technology? Purdue University’s Tim Cason, the Gadomski Chair of Economics at the Krannert School of Management, is addressing that question through experimental economics.

    Full article: Clean Trade

  • Intellectualizing Risk

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018

    As the business implications of big data continue to grow, so too does the need for academic research that helps lead to improved industry practices. Thomas Brush, a professor in the strategic management area at the Krannert School, is doing just that by merging his interdisciplinary work on product lifecycle management (PLM) to help the Licensing Executives Society (LES) create a better standard for managing intellectual property (IP) suppliers.

  •  Person Experimenting with Technology

    Innovation Impact

    Wednesday, February 28, 2018

    Purdue University and the Krannert School of Management are helping early stage startups in Indiana navigate the “valley of death” to commercialize their technology through the National Science Foundation’s “Phase 0” pilot program for its Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Node.

    Full article: Innovation Impact

  • Conflicts between work and family

    Friday, February 16, 2018

    Professor Kelly Wilson discusses conflicts between work and family

  • Return policy on customized products

    Wednesday, January 3, 2018

    Assistant Professor Gokce Esenduran discusses return policy on customized products